Barbara Allen (key of D)

Artist: Traditional (English)
User: ralph estes
Duration: 130 seconds
Delay: 12 seconds
Chord names: Not defined
Abusive:
Comment: -

URL

Updated last time:
ralph estes,
March 2, 2018 6:58 PM

Text

                                     Barbara Allen [key: D]

Scotland, Samuel Pepys sang it for friends New Year’s Eve, 1665. Performed by
traveling troubadours since the Middle Ages.  Came to America at least by 1836.
Kind of hard to understand why it has lasted so well, and been so popular, for so
long.

It’s a story of a wealthy young man (has a servant), who was evidently something 
of a rounder, flirting with every girl in the tavern, but now is on his deathbed - 
from what?  Surely not merely from love, but that’s what he claims when the girl he 
has rather imperiously called to his bedside.  She is a bit haughty herself, spurns 
him and leaves.  But then she sees his coffin, has second thoughts, seems to almost 
will her own dying.  

Only after they are both dead do we get a touching love note, as the rose entwines 
with the briar into a lasting and charming lovers’ knot.

[After singing]  Do any of you have an idea as to why this little song has  
lasted so long and so well?


Twas in the merry month of May 
When green buds all were swelling, 
Sweet William on his death bed lay 
For the love of Barbara Allen.

He sent his servant to the town 
To the place where she was dwelling, 
Saying you must come, to my master dear 
If your name be Barbara Allen.

So slowly, slowly she got up 
And slowly she drew nigh him, 
And the only words to him did say 
Young man I think you're dying.

He turned his face unto the wall 
And death was in him welling, 
Good-bye, good-bye, to my friends all 
Be kind to Barbara Allen.

When he was dead and laid in grave 
She heard the death bells knelling 
And every stroke to her did say 
Hard hearted Barbara Allen.

Oh father, oh father, go dig my grave 
Make it both long and narrow, 
Sweet William died of love for me
I’ll die for him tomorrow.

Barbara Allen was buried in the old churchyard 
Sweet William was buried beside her, 
From William's heart, there grew a rose 
From Barbara Allen's, there grew a briar.

They grew and grew in the old churchyard 
Till they could grow no higher 
And there they formed a true lover's knot 
As the rose grew round the briar.

Comments